All posts by CH

Skull Cane Proves Bondo Isn’t Just for Dents

[Eric Strebel] is quickly becoming a favorite here at Hackaday. He’s got a fantastic knack for turning everyday objects into something awesome, and he’s kind of enough to document his builds for the viewing pleasure of hackers and makers everywhere. It also doesn’t hurt that his voice and narration style gives us a real Bob Ross vibe.

The latest “Happy Accident” out of his workshop is a neat light-up cane made from a ceramic skull found at a local store. But while the finished cane itself might not be terribly exciting, the construction methods demonstrated by [Eric] are well worth the price of admission. Rather than using Bondo like the filler we’re all accustomed to, he shows how it can be used to rapidly build free-form structures and components.

After building up layers of Bondo, he uses a cheese grater to smooth out the rough surface and a hobby knife to clean up the edges. According to [Eric], one of the benefits of working with Bondo like this is that it’s very easy to shape and manipulate before it fully hardens; allowing you to really make things up as you go.

[Eric] also shares a little secret about how he makes his gray Bondo: he mixes some of the toner from a laser printer cartridge into it. This allows you to very cheaply augment the color of the filler, and is definitely something to file away for future reference.

If the video below leaves you hungry for more [Eric Strebel], check out his fantastic series on working with foam core, which should lead you right down the rabbit hole to his DIY foam core spray painting booth.

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DOTTER – HUGE ARDUINO BASED DOT MATRIX PRINTER #3DThursday #3DPrinting


A395fa207918fdbcb806d6af6105ff2e preview featured

Shared by NikodemBartnik on Thingiverse:

Doter is a huge dot matrix printer based on Arduino. Most of the parts are 3D printed, there are also 28BYJ48 stepper motors (the cheapest stepper motors you can find) and some basic components, there is also PCB that you can buy right here. It can print on the paper up to 55cm wide and infinity long. More info about this project can be found on instructables.

None of this models need supports, pulleys has supports build in, because it would be impossible to remove supports from the inside of the pulley. Those models are rather easy to print, but it takes some time, because they are quite big.

Wheels that will move the paper should be printed with flex filament to do it better. I made a rim for this wheel that should be printed with PLA and on this wheel you can put a rubber wheel.

You can also buy PCB for this project on tindie:

And subscribe to my channel: https://goo.gl/x6Y32E

For more info don’t forget to check out instructables project about doter. That’s my biggest project when it comes to size, and that’s awesome! If you have any idea of what I can print on 30 meters (yes, meters) long paper, let me know in the comments!

Download the files and learn more


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!


via Adafruit

Analysis of 3D-Printer Power Consumption Using Creality CR-10. TL;DR: 24/7 Operation = 2¢/Hour | #3DThursday #3DPrinting


Rob Cockerham has an interesting analysis of the power demands of his CR-10 3D-printer – when only the fans are running, when the nozzle is operating at 185°C, the heating bed is maintained at 45°C, and while the printer is operating on 2 axes.

The power use of a 3D printer is complex. The CR-10 is a loud machine, which can make it seem as though it is using a lot of energy. However, its main power draw is its heated printing bed.

Below I’ve illustrated some of the phases of a print job, and the power use I measured during those phases.

Read more.


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!


via Adafruit

QuickBASIC Lives On with QB64

When I got my first computer, a second hand 386 running MS-DOS 6.22, I didn’t have an Internet connection. But I did have QuickBASIC installed and a stack of programming magazines the local library was throwing out, so I had plenty to keep myself busy. At the time, I thought QuickBASIC was more or less indistinguishable from magic. I could write simple code and compile it into an .exe, put it on a floppy, and give it to somebody else to run on their own machine. It seemed too good to be true, how could this technology possibly be improved upon?

Of course, that was many years ago, and things are very different now. The programming languages du jour are worlds more capable than the plodding BASIC variants of the 80’s and 90’s. But still, when I found a floppy full of programs I wrote decades ago, I couldn’t help but wonder about getting them running again. With something like DOSBox I reasoned I should be able to install the QuickBASIC IDE and run them like I was back on my trusty 386.

Unfortunately, that was not to be. Maybe I’m just not well versed enough in DOSBox, but I couldn’t get the IDE to actually run any of the source code I pulled off the floppy. This was disappointing, but then it occured to me that modern BASIC interpreters are probably being developed in some corner of the Internet, and perhaps I could find a way to run my nearly 30 year old code without having to rely on 30 year old software to do it.

The QB64 Project

After searching around a bit, I found the very cool QB64 project. This is an open source QuickBASIC development environment that is not only completely compatible with existing programs, but adds in functions and capabilities that were unthinkable back on my 386. Displaying a PNG, loading TTF fonts, or playing an MP3 in the background can be accomplished with just one or two commands.

Such things were possible with the original QuickBASIC, but existed more in the realm of tech demos than anything else. Oh the games I could have made back in the day with software like this! I had to be content with bleeps and bloops, and even that required you to figure out the timing for the tones yourself.

Even better, QB64 is cross-platform and supports compiling into native binaries for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS. That meant that not only could I run my old code within the IDE, but I could actually compile it into a binary for my Linux desktop. I don’t own a Windows computer anymore, but with WINE I was able to run the Windows version of QB64 and compile an .exe that I could give to my friends who are still living in the dark ages.

You can even use QB64 to compile QuickBasic code into an Android application, though there’s considerable hoops to jump through and it currently only works on Windows.

Conjuring Black Magic

This might be lost on those who never wrote BASIC code on a vintage machine, but the following code creates a 800×600 screen, puts a full screen PNG up, plays an MP3, and writes a message using a TrueType font.

' Init screen
SCREEN _NEWIMAGE(800, 600, 32)

' Load files
menubg& = _LOADIMAGE("splash.png")
menufont& = _LOADFONT("font.ttf", 30)
theme& = _SNDOPEN("theme.mp3", "SYNC,VOL")

' Set theme volume, start playing
_SNDVOL theme&, 0.3
_SNDPLAY theme&

' Load font
_FONT menufont&

' Show full screen image
_PUTIMAGE (0, 0), menubg&

' Say hello
PRINT "Hello Hackaday!"

As a comparison, this QuickBasic tool for simply displaying a JPEG image clocks in at 653 lines of code.

Revisiting a Project

In my edgy teenage days, I created a graphical version of the “Drugwars” style game. You moved a little stick man around a pixelated environment, buying and selling substances that I had heard about in movies but certainly had never seen in person. It was terrible. But it was part of my youth and I thought it would be fun to see if I could shoehorn in some modern flash using QB64.

As it turns out, transparent PNGs and the ability to display proper fonts makes things a lot easier. Being able to play music and ambient sound effects in the background makes even sloppily done games seem a lot better. The following screenshots are of the main menu of my little teenage crime fantasy, before and after the application of QB64. Note that the core source code itself is more or less the same, I’m just interleaving it with the ability to load and display external files.


Should You Be Using QuickBasic?

No, you definitely should not. I didn’t write this to try and convince anyone to jump on a programming language that peaked before many of our readers were even born. QuickBASIC is an antiquated language, stuck with outdated methods and limitations that are confounding to the modern programmer. But QB64 does do an excellent job of modernizing this classic language, if only to a relatively small degree in the grand scheme of things, for those of us who cut our teeth on it.

Being able to take a disk with BASIC code I wrote on a DOS 386 in the early 90’s and turn it into a Linux binary in 2018 is a pretty neat accomplishment, and I salute the QB64 development team for making it possible. I won’t be writing any new code in the language, and I don’t suggest you do either, but it was a lot of fun being able to revisit this period in my life and drag it kicking and screaming into the modern era.

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DeadPool x Pikachu #3DThursday #3DPrinting



roykinglo shares this great dual color deign mash up of DeadPool x Pikachu!

download the files on: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2768243


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!


via Adafruit

Exixe: Miniature Nixie Tube Driver Board

NixieDriver1 (Medium)

While I have the pleasure of reviewing a multitude of interesting devices writing for Tindie, few products jump out quite as much as this one in the sense of it being something that hackers have needed for years, but never thought to ask for—a Nixie tube driver board! Yes, that’s right, now instead of coming up with your own custom circuitry or buying a kit or even a fully assembled model, you can use these exixe boards to control a Nixie tube with 3 wires via SPI.

Since they’re individual modules, you could arrange them however you want for a unique display powered by an Arduino, ESP8266, or many other devices. The boards come in two different versions shown below. The board on the left accommodates an IN-14 tube, and the board on the right is used with an IN-12.

NixieDriver (Medium)

Of course there is one small catch in that Nixie tubes need 170VDC to operate properly. These boards don’t supply that, so you’ll need to turn to a Nixie power supply module that can be had for less than $10 plus shipping. As powering each one individually would add expense and bulk, this seems like a good tradeoff.

While this could unleash a flood of creativity in the Nixie display department, if you’d like more of a head start with your creation you could turn instead to the MSP430 Nixie tube clock kit. It includes everything you’ll need to build your own clock besides a power supply. As seen in this writeup, I built one of my own, which was a lot of fun and it looks great!

The post Exixe: Miniature Nixie Tube Driver Board appeared first on Tindie Blog.

via Tindie

The Creation of a 7 Foot Monster Hunter Sword


When Monster Hunter: World was released at the end of January, I mostly took notice of the cats in the game. It happens. But the game is packed with so much more, including unique armor and weaponry like the Giant Jawblade sword. Rooster Teeth’s Master & Apprentice decided to craft one in real life (without killing any monsters, thank goodness) and used balsa wood to fabricate the 7 foot long sword. Watch how they do it in the above video.

See more of Master & Apprentice at YouTube.


via Adafruit