David Lynch Is Creating a Virtual Reality Experience for Twin Peaks

via Adafruit:

Via Open Culture!

David Lynch and Mark Frost’s Black Lodge/Red Room, the extra-dimensional space that is both an integral part of Twin Peaks and iconic in its set design, is a place most of us would not want to visit. Detective Dale Cooper got trapped there for 25 years and it was not pleasant. But that hasn’t stopped fans from wanting to create that space any chance they get, whether as a bar or place to sing karaoke. And when the final episode of the second season showed the lodge was an endless series of rooms connected by hallways, it wasn’t long until the video game versions started appearing.

Well, now you can really get lost in the Black Lodge with the slow unveiling of Twin Peaks VR, which AdWeek says will be available “sometime in 2019” on Steam for HTC Vive and Oculus Rift.

This second clip gives us a bit more of the Red Room and a dubious looking Audrey Horne. The Convenience Store, however, is well done.

But this is, we stress, nowhere near a finished version. It’s not even clear if any of this will make it into the final version.

A beta version premiered two weeks ago at Lynch’s Festival of Disruption in Los Angeles. AdWeek had the only real description of the five minute demo, which starts near the ring of saplings in Glastonbury Grove:

Immediately after the pool turns to blood, viewers are transported to the Red Room, an extra-dimensional space that’s been a key feature of Twin Peaks in both the original series from the 1990s and the modern revival that aired last year. (It’s also a location frequently visited by the show’s main character, FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper.) Inside the room, viewers aren’t able to walk like they can in some VR experiences, but they’re able to teleport within the room as it rapidly changes in ways similar to what happens in the show itself. (One moment, a statue falls over before running around as a shadow on the other side of a curtain. In another, users can pick up a coffee mug that won’t empty until the second time it’s picked up.) The demo ends as a white horse appears in the room in the distance, surrounded in darkness but unreachable.

The best news is that the company developing the game, Collider Games, is giving creative control to Lynch, so hopefully the game won’t be like those terrible non-Lynch episodes in Season Two. Says AdWeek:

See more!

 
 
 

Ecapture Unveils EyesMap, Tablet Built for 3D Scanning

Ecapture, a company based in Mérida Spain, today unveiled their own tablet with extensive 3D scanning and measurement capabilities, called the EyesMap. Unlike the typical tablet you and I are used to, this device is made primarily as a measuring and 3D scanning too.

EyesMap, a new tablet dedicated to 3D scanning


 

Ecapture Unveils EyesMap, Tablet Built for 3D Scanning – 3DPrint.com.

Morphing Haptic Table

futurist-foresight:

The possibilities for this morphing tactile display are endless! This may just be the haptic tech of the future.

futurescope:

Well, what can I say… The Future is here. This is one of the most amazing artifacts from the future I’ve seen in a long time.

Think about the potential and what you can do with it when they increase the resolution and the strength of the blocks (carbon composites, graphene… whatever).

[made by MIT Professor Hiroshi Ishii and his students] [via Kevin Kelly]

Augmented Reality App Assists Tumor Removal

mevis3_AR_surgeryfuturetechreport:

AR in the ER

recipeforawesome:

(via Augmented Reality App Guides Surgeons During Tumor Removal – PSFK)

Tablets and smartphones have recently found a wide range of uses in the healthcare industry, from building image databases for doctors to helping patients better understand their surgical procedures. Taking these mobile technologies one step further, we look at an application that takes augmented reality into the operating room to assist doctors with complex procedures. Imagine if at the touch of a button, your surgeon could map your internal organs and pinpoint the correct blood vessel or location of a tumor, rather than having to rely on memory or constantly refer to images and charts.

A new iPad app from the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Germany is using augmented reality technology to help surgeons remove liver tumors without damaging critical vessels within the organ. Before the surgery takes place, a CT scan is performed on the patient, allowing an accompanying software to identify and image the pathways of blood vessels. This information is then transferred to an iPad, which can be used during the surgery.

Augmented reality, AR, Fraunhofer Institute