Category Archives: Electronics

Why do we itch?


via It’s Okay To Be Smart


via Adafruit

Bitcoin explainer created using AI #Bitcoin #AI


This hilarious, completely un-educational, video was made using the predictive typing site Botnik.

Via Mashable:

Look, understanding cryptocurrency can be confusing. We here at Mashable are dedicated to helping our readers understand the complexities of this new form of currency and how it affects our day-to-day lives.

But even we are having our collective minds blown by this video, an “explainer” of cryptocurrency created by Botnik Studios that was “written using predictive keyboards trained on dozens of Bitcoin explainers.”

And the results are as insane as you might expect:

“To understand how bitcoin transactions are created, randomly pick a number between 1 and 30,000. Now spend that amount of money on Ethereum.”

Here is a piece I published on Elephants:

Botnik Studios

Read more and have some fun!


via Adafruit

Edwin Land Instant Photo Legacy #celebratephotography


From The Conversation:

It probably happens every minute of the day: A little girl demands to see the photo her parent has just taken of her. Today, thanks to smartphones and other digital cameras, we can see snapshots immediately, whether we want to or not. But in 1944 when 3-year-old Jennifer Land asked to see the family vacation photo that her dad had just taken, the technology didn’t exist. So her dad, Edwin Land, invented it.

Three years later, after plenty of scientific development, Land and his Polaroid Corporation realized the miracle of nearly instant imaging. The film exposure and processing hardware are contained within the camera; there’s no muss or fuss for the photographer who just points and shoots and then watches the image materialize on the photo once it spools out of the camera.

Land is probably best known for the “instant photo” – or the spiritual progenitor of today’s ubiquitous selfie. His Polaroid camera was first released commercially in 1948 at retail locations and prices aimed at the postwar middle class. But this is just one of a host of technological breakthroughs Land invented and commercialized, most of which centered around light and how it interacts with materials. The technology used to show a 3D movie and the goggles we wear in the theater were made possible by Land and his colleagues. The camera aboard the U-2 spy plane, as featured in the movie “Bridge of Spies,” was a Land product, as were even some aspects of the plane’s mechanics. He also worked on theoretical problems, drawing on a deep understanding of both chemistry and physics.


Photofooter

We #celebratephotography here at Adafruit every Saturday. From photographers of all levels to projects you have made or those that inspire you to make, we’re on it! Got a tip? Well, send it in!

If you’re interested in making your own project and need some gear, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out our Raspberry Pi accessories and our DIY cameras.


via Adafruit

Hacker Shack Light Paints with a Robot #celebratephotography


From Hacker Shack on Hackster.io:

Did you know that you can make light paintings with a long exposure camera? Light painting is a photographic technique in which exposures are made by moving a hand-held light source while taking a long exposure photograph. We take this a step further by finely controlling the light source’s movement with a stepper motor driven rover. The results are stunning. The project consists of a Raspberry Pi 3, two stepper motors, and a NeoPixel LED matrix. It can easily be recreated with a 3D printer and all of the code is provided.

Read more and see more on YouTube!


Photofooter

We #celebratephotography here at Adafruit every Saturday. From photographers of all levels to projects you have made or those that inspire you to make, we’re on it! Got a tip? Well, send it in!

If you’re interested in making your own project and need some gear, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out our Raspberry Pi accessories and our DIY cameras.


via Adafruit

Why do we sweat?


via TED-Ed


via Adafruit

A Radiologist’s X-Ray Photographs of Flowers from the 1930s


Tasker Fuschia 1938 768x968

Via Hyperallergic

When we think of X-rays, we generally think of the human body’s skeletal structure, but in the 1930s, one osteopathist turned his attention to the anatomy of plants and used his X-ray machine as what it fundamentally exists as: a camera.

When we think of X-rays, we generally think of the human body’s skeletal structure. But in the 1930s, one osteopathist turned his attention to the anatomy of plants and used his X-ray machine as what it fundamentally exists as: a camera. Dr. Dain L. Tasker, then head radiologist at Los Angeles’s Wilshire Hospital, cultivated a hobby of photographing individual flowers using X-ray film, resulting in beautiful black-and-white prints that highlight the graceful lines of plant forms with incredible detail. What began as a doctor’s experiments in marrying science and art yielded a collection of hundreds of striking botanical images, a selection of which are now on view in Floral Studies, an exhibition at San Diego’s Joseph Bellows Gallery.

“Flowers are the expression of the love life of plants,” Tasker wrote of his photographs, as former curator and art historian Bonnie Yochelson recounts in her introduction to a monograph of his images. The poetry and beauty he saw in botany is evident in his minimal compositions: dark and diaphanous, each plant Tasker photographed stretches the length of the surface of each print. All parts are illuminated and completely exposed: we can clearly see the layers of petals that form the cup of a tulip and the carpels usually concealed in a lily’s bell, now gossamer as if lightly sketched. In one radiograph, a philodendron rises tall, curving like the flame of a candle; in another, Tasker has captured a lotus from above so its petals splay like a gaping eye, with an iris surrounded by eyelashes of filaments.

There is nothing difficult about taking such images, Tasker apparently noted, with the only requirements being “an abiding patience” and a knowledge of “flowers and their habits.” Still, he struggled at first to produce proper prints from his X-ray negatives. Initially an amateur photographer of landscapes and portraits, Tasker first started exploring the artistic possibilities of radiology after seeing an X-ray photograph of an amaryllis taken by a physicist he knew. With no formal training in photography but desiring to better his techniques, Tasker reached out to Will Connell, who was then teaching photography at Art Center College of Design. In addition to supervising Tasker’s printing processes, Connell also helped the doctor’s works go on display at the 1931 and 1932 annual salons organized by the Camera Pictorialists of Los Angeles as well as at the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition in San Francisco. Tasker’s radiographs eventually made their way into national photography magazines, from US Camera’s October 1939 issue to Popular Photography’s March 1942 issue. Other prints he gave as gifts to his nursing students upon their graduation.

Today, radiographs created for non-medical purposes are common: natural history museums, for instance, take X-ray photographs of specimens to examine them without damage. A number of artists— Albert C. Koetsier, Steven Meyers, and Nick Veasey, for instance — also document the hidden skeletons of our world. Tasker stands as a pioneer of botanical radiographs; especially emerging from a period when radiography was young and scientists’ understanding of radiation was still developing, his images represent the new intrigue in using technology to examine the structure of matter — not only in the name of science, but in his case, to also find an unexpected beauty in nature.

See more!

Tasker A Rose 1936 768x953


via Adafruit

60’s Commercial for the A.C. Gilbert Erector Set #SaturdayMorningCartoons


My grandparents had an erector set while I was growing up. One of the joys of going over to their house was building elaborate worlds. I loved that set so much more than any bunch of Legos I ever encountered.

Here’s more on the fascinating company that made the set, posted on youtube by Thomas B. Barker:

More on the A.C. Gilbert Company


Each Saturday Morning here at Adafruit is Saturday Morning Cartoons! Be sure to check our cartoon and animated posts both nostalgic and new that inspire makers of all ages! You’ll find how-tos for young makers, approaches to learning about science and engineering, and all sorts of comic strip and animated Saturday Morning fun! Be sure to check out our Adafruit products featuring comic book art while you’re at it!


via Adafruit