Category Archives: Electronics

NEW GUIDE: Circuit Playground Express Serial Connections @Adafruit @MSMakeCode #CircuitPlaygroundExpress #CircuitPython


makecode_Capture.png

A new guide in the Adafruit Learning System today: Circuit Playground Express Serial Communications.

Do you need to hook up a serial connection device? Or perform serial communications with another board like a Raspberry Pi? This guide shows you the basics of serial communications and the hookups. Examples are coded in Microsoft MakeCode and CircuitPython showing output of data to a terminal program.

Check out this new guide today!

CPX + Serial


via Adafruit

NEW GUIDE: Make It Switch @MSMakeCode @Adafruit #CircuitPlaygroundExpress


Make It Switch

Have you wanted to add external switches to your project but got lost in all the types, connections, etc.?

Make It Switch, a new guide in the Adafruit Learning System guides you through all the info – various switch types, naming, functionality, and how to use in Microsoft MakeCode, CircuitPython, and Arduino. Worried about switch debouncing, that’s included also. Check out this handy tutorial today.


via Adafruit

NEW GUIDE: Make It Log – send data directly to a spreadsheet @MSMakeCode @Adafruit #AdafruitLearningSystem


Make It Log to Spreadsheet

A new guide in the Adafruit Learning System today. Make It Log shows you how to capture data from a Circuit Playground Express directly to the spreadsheet of your choice, either on your computer or your Android phone.

Using the Human Interface Device in USB, the Circuit Playground Express emulates a keyboard. It types out the numbers for your measurements and ensures the cursor in the spreadsheet goes back to the next line for the next set of measurements. So easy!

The examples are coded both in Microsoft MakeCode and Circuit Python, choose your preferred coding method.

Get logging your data to a spreadsheet today with this guide.


via Adafruit

Bitcoin Powered Electrical Outlet


If you ever wanted to charge for electrical usage here is a way to do it with Bitcoin. Shared by Islam Roston on Hackster.io:

Project Idea
Bitcoin and blockchain technology opened a whole lot of opportunities for paying for goods and services but the catch was that it wasn’t fully automated because it lacked easy hardware integration support. However, it got easier with the release of the Koyn library. In short, the Koyn library allows your hardware like Arduino compatible boards to receive and send Bitcoin payments.

One application model for Bitcoin that interests me is pay per service, and one of many applications I decided to get my hands dirty on is renting electricity. So, I started building an electrical outlet that is powered by Bitcoin.

Disclaimer
This project works on HIGH AC voltage which is quite dangerous. Your safety is your own responsibility, including proper use of equipment and safety gear, and determining whether you have adequate skill and experience. You must accept that you and you alone are responsible for your safety and the safety of others if you choose to build this project.

Learn more!


via Adafruit

Bitcoin Powered Electrical Outlet


If you ever wanted to charge for electrical usage here is a way to do it with Bitcoin. Shared by Islam Roston on Hackster.io:

Project Idea
Bitcoin and blockchain technology opened a whole lot of opportunities for paying for goods and services but the catch was that it wasn’t fully automated because it lacked easy hardware integration support. However, it got easier with the release of the Koyn library. In short, the Koyn library allows your hardware like Arduino compatible boards to receive and send Bitcoin payments.

One application model for Bitcoin that interests me is pay per service, and one of many applications I decided to get my hands dirty on is renting electricity. So, I started building an electrical outlet that is powered by Bitcoin.

Disclaimer
This project works on HIGH AC voltage which is quite dangerous. Your safety is your own responsibility, including proper use of equipment and safety gear, and determining whether you have adequate skill and experience. You must accept that you and you alone are responsible for your safety and the safety of others if you choose to build this project.

Learn more!


via Adafruit

ATtiny85 & LIR-2032-based TV-B-Gone!



If you have a pile of surface-mount components laying around you could take a stab and building this teeny tiny Micro TV-B-Gone, that isn’t much wider than a 2032 battery (the 20 in 2032 tells you the battery is 20mm wide, so emphasis on ‘micro’ in Micro TV-B-Gone!):

The Micro TV-B-Gone is based off of Adafruit’s original TV-B-Gone kit, except made to be as small as possible, using an LIR-2032 coin cell.

I based this project off of the Adafruit TV-B-Gone kit. I wanted to start getting into using surface mount components on my projects, and seeing as the TV-B-Gone was my first foray into soldering, I figured that it would be a great project to work on.

The device takes a rechargeable LIR-2032 battery, and is activated pressing the single button on top. It will run through all TV power codes, and then go into a low power mode, waiting for the next button press. The battery will last around 40 full cycles, before being reduced down to 3.5 volts.

Project at hackaday.io


Additional Reading:

‘Kommercial Killer’ Silences Your TV During Commercials – Using Trinket + @oshpark PCBs | via @circuitcellar

Watch Mitch Altman talk about the history of the TV-B-Gone in this talk ‘History of the Maker Movement’ Panel Presentation | @hopeconf @maltman23 @SherryHuss


via Adafruit

Crowdsourced List of ‘favorite Linux terminal’ Tips & Tricks | #linux #terminal


What’s your favorite trick for terminal productivity? Maybe it’s a simple alias that you set up for a long string of options on a command you use frequently. Maybe it’s a collection of short scripts you use to automate the boring part of your workflow. Perhaps it’s your mastery of a terminal multiplexer like screen or tmux. Or maybe your memorization of all the Bash keyboard shortcuts is what finally made you feel like a command line hero.

Whatever your favorite trick, take a moment in the spirit of open source and share it with the community. What do you wish you knew when you were starting out at the terminal, and why? Let us know in the comments below.

Opensource.com recently posted asking for the community’s favorite Linux terminal tricks — below is a sampling of the responses.

this one’s special for KDE users:


(neat script – check it out here on GitHub)

lastly:

See more responses here.


via Adafruit