Category Archives: Internet of Things

The creator of Javascript is using blockchain to save the internet from ads #Blockchain


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Brendan Eich hopes to redesign how advertising works on the internet. A new platform utilizes “Basic Attention Token” to assign value for user attention. Via Digital Trends:

Every targeted advertisement you see on your smartphone is likely bounced through a variety of ad exchange networks, buy- and sell-side servers, placement verification services, and data management platforms, before reaching your device. These data transfers do more than make pages load slower. They also eat into your data plan and drain your battery. It costs you a fraction of a cent per ad, but those fractions add up.

A report from the New York Times found that 50 percent of mobile data transferred during visits to popular news websites was a result of ads. Depending on the cost of your mobile data plan, that means you could be paying up to $23 per month just to see ads you never asked for.

Broadly speaking, Eich’s solution is an attempt to wipe the slate clean and put a better system in place, one where you aren’t assaulted with ads, and where the lion’s share of the money spent by advertisers doesn’t fall into the hands of middlemen.

The system is made up of two main parts, the first of which is a new browser called Brave. In Eich’s own words, Brave is “a privacy focused browser that puts users first and blocks third-party ads and trackers by default.” That means you receive not just a clean, ad-free, and fast browsing experience, but also that your privacy isn’t compromised by an onslaught of tracking bugs and cookies.

It’s true that you could achieve a similar result in Chrome or Firefox by installing a handful of extensions, but Brave does both ad blocking and tracker blocking simultaneously — and at all times — from the moment you fire it up. It also keeps nifty stats on the number of ads you’ve blocked over time, and how much time you’ve saved because of faster, tracker-free page loads.

Read more!


via Adafruit

Complex Rube Goldberg machine: The Cake Server


Joseph’s Machines shared his most complex Rube Goldberg machine ever on Youtube!

I hate waiting for dessert, so here’s a Rube Goldberg machine to streamline dinnertime. It lets me keep eating, with no break before cake. It’s my most complex yet and took 3 months to make so I hope you enjoy it!

See more!


via Adafruit

Apple unveils its newest recycling robot ahead of Earth Day


Dims

Via Engadget

Looks like Liam, Apple’s phone-dismembering robot, now has a little sister. Just ahead of Earth Day, the Cupertino-based company revealed the newest member of its robo-recycling team: Daisy.

Like her predecessor, Daisy was developed by Apple’s in-house R&D team and even leverages some of the same components that were initially created for Liam. The new robot is tasked with disassembling iphones, stripping them of their reusable parts and sorting out the refuse. Daisy is reportedly capable of dismantling nine different iPhone variants and stripping up to 200 handsets an hour, all without damaging any of the salvageable parts.

Apple also announced the start of its GiveBack program, which runs until April 30th. For every phone that customers turn in at an Apple store or online, either directly for recycling or as a trade-in, the company will make a donation to Conservation International. For their environmental efforts, customers will receive an in-store credit or an Apple Gift Card, whichever they prefer.

This news comes on the heels of Apple’s announcement earlier this month that its entire operation — stores, offices, data centers and co-located sites across 43 countries — are fully powered by green energy (though technically the company does rely on carbon credits and offsets to hit that number).

See more!


via Adafruit

These diamonds from space formed inside a long-lost planet, scientists say


via The Washington Post

Ten years ago, an Arizona astronomer spotted an asteroid that was headed straight for Earth. Swiftly he summoned the help of colleagues and casual stargazers, who tracked the space rock as it exploded in the sky, raining shrapnel down on the Nubian desert in Sudan. Students from the University of Khartoum volunteered to search for fragments, ultimately recovering more than 600 pieces of the meteorite now known as Almahata Sitta. It was the first time scientists had ever traced an asteroid in the sky to a rock they could hold in their hands.

But that is not even the coolest thing about Almahata Sitta. Not nearly.

A new study published in the journal Nature Communications reports that the meteorite contains tiny diamonds — yes, diamonds. Those diamonds contain even tinier impurities called inclusions. And within those inclusions are signatures of a long-lost planet as large as Mars — a 4.5 billion-year-old relic that was destroyed during the earliest days of the solar system.

“These samples are coming from an era that we don’t have any access to,” said Farhang Nabiei, a materials scientist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne and the lead author of the new report. The diamonds with the Almahata Sitta meteorite formed during a transition era in the solar system, when the dust and gas that swirled around the sun coalesced into planetary embryos, then grew into planets.

“And we are part of the planets,” Nabiei said. “This is part of the story of how we came to be.”

Almahata Sitta belongs to a class of rocks known as ureilites. They are partly differentiated — not made of the primitive material that constituted the solar nebula, but also not as well mixed and baked as rocks that come from modern planets. Unlike other meteorites, which can be traced to parent bodies such as asteroids, Mars or the moon by comparing the ratios of different varieties of elements, these rocks have no known source. They seem to have been formed inside bodies that no longer exist.

And they always contain tiny flecks of diamond.

Read and see more!


via Adafruit

Westworld Season 2: The Biggest Questions About Westworld #SciFiSunday


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Vulture has put together a handy list of questions to consider before watching Westworld Season 2.

Are you ready for another loop? The sci-fi obsession with a world of androids and six-shooters starts again on Sunday, when HBO’s Westworld returns for season two. The first season was a smash hit of a puzzle box, a story that fans loved to dissect and analyze so much that the its creators (lightly) mocked that spoiler-driven passion by Rickrolling them. The new season promises action, mystery, and more riddles to obsess over — but, of course, we have plenty of lingering questions that still need answering. Before you dive back into Westworld, here’s a guide to the biggest mysteries from season one.

Read more.


via Adafruit

Giant Tie Fighter #SciFiSunday


Incredible build from Allan Carver.

The Last Jedi was coming out and I just scored a bunch of electric wheelchair motors. Hmmm…. what to do… what to do…

Of course, build a giant electric remote controlled tie fighter big enough to sit in, complete with sound effects and music track. 

Steel tube frame covered with L200 foam on the body and 2″ thick rigid insulation foam for the wings.

DX8 RC receiver that connects to a Sabertooth dual-motor driver. Audioboard connected to a 30-watt amplifier.

Read more.

Via laughingsquid


via Adafruit

Motion-Activated Sparkle Skirt by @morrill_rob @MSMakecode


Motion-Activated Sparkle Skirt – YouTube.

A Circuit Playground Express controls the NeoPixels sewn into this skirt. Coded with MakeCode.


via Adafruit