Category Archives: Makers

Everything you ever wanted to know about seltzer @qz

Quarts shared on YouTube:

Everything you ever wanted to know about seltzer

Seltzer: It tastes like nothing and makes you burp. And in the US, it’s insanely popular right now.

But why? Why is seltzer having a moment? Where did seltzer come from? Is seltzer bad for you? And why do so many people call it seltzer instead of sparkling water or fizzy water?

We are obsessed with seltzer, and we’re happy to share.


via Adafruit

Cora the Flying Taxi

Via Kitty Hawk

Meet Cora, Kitty Hawk’s prototype air taxi that was designed and built to bring the freedom of flight to our everyday lives.

Cora combines electric propulsion, vertical take-off and self-flying software to pioneer an entirely new way to move.

via Adafruit

Libby Oliver’s Soft Shells #celebratephotography


From CBC Arts via Konbini:

Libby Oliver is the Victoria-based artist behind this ongoing portrait series. It’s called Soft Shells, and she began the project last summer.

Each photo in the series is about a different person, and whether they’re four years old or 88, Oliver photographs each subject along with their wardrobes — every sock, every shoe, every worn-out soccer jersey — ultimately wrapping them in cotton-poly blend cocoons.

Read more and check out the full series/more from Libby Oliver


We #celebratephotography here at Adafruit every Saturday. From photographers of all levels to projects you have made or those that inspire you to make, we’re on it! Got a tip? Well, send it in!

If you’re interested in making your own project and need some gear, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out our Raspberry Pi accessories and our DIY cameras.

via Adafruit

Wired Camera Trigger #celebratephotography


From Jennifer Deegan on

In our previous work we triggered the camera using an infra red remote control. In this new project we have converted to an electrical shutter release wire, fired by the arduino via an audio jack.

The main gain from this conversion is that we will then be able to use mirror lock-up to reduce vibration. This is not possible using the infra red remote control. We will also avoid losing occasional shutter releases when the sunshine in the room is so bright that the infra red signal get lost in the intensity of the sunshine. This has been an issue in summer before.

The design was adapted from Martyn Curry’s system.

We did not alter the code on the arduino, as the commands that fired the shutter using the infra red remote control work that same way in triggering this system.

Read more


We #celebratephotography here at Adafruit every Saturday. From photographers of all levels to projects you have made or those that inspire you to make, we’re on it! Got a tip? Well, send it in!

If you’re interested in making your own project and need some gear, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out our Raspberry Pi accessories and our DIY cameras.

via Adafruit

Inside Google’s plan to build a smart neighborhood in Toronto


Via Engadget

n the Sidewalk Labs website is a 200-page document explaining its vision for a smart neighborhood in Toronto. It’s packed with illustrations that show a warm, idyllic community full of grassy parks, modular buildings and underground tunnels with delivery robots and internet cabling inside. The text describes “a truly complete community” that’s free of cars and committed to reducing its carbon footprint. Underpinning everything is a network of sensors that can monitor noise, traffic and pollution, collecting the troves of data required to understand and improve the city’s design.

Flipping through the pages, it’s easy to see how the company — an offshoot of Google parent Alphabet — was chosen to revitalize the Lake Ontario waterfront. The lengthy pitch document, however, is just a taste of what the area might become. It’s a dreamy but meticulously thought-out mood board summarizing what Sidewalk Labs has been pondering for the past two years. Reading it cover to cover, you can get lost in the scale and ambition of such a project. Most companies would struggle to execute just one aspect of the plan: autonomous transit, for instance, or buildings that can be quickly and cheaply repurposed depending on the time of day or needs of the city.

Sidewalk Labs, however, wants to do it all.

The project started with an email sent by Eric Schmidt, Google’s then executive chairman, to Dan Doctoroff in 2014. The subject line read, “The City of the Future.” Doctoroff was the head of Bloomberg LP, an umbrella company for its terminal business, news wire service and journalistic ventures. Previously, he had worked with Michael Bloomberg as New York’s deputy mayor for economic development and rebuilding. Schmidt wanted to know if Doctoroff would meet Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin and listen to their thoughts on smart cities.

At the time, Google was working on its smiley face self-driving car. Behind the scenes, however, the company was having broader conversations about technology and how it could be used to improve urban life. Page and Brin were enthusiastic but knew they needed a specialist, or some kind of leader, who understood cities as much as technology. Their conversations with Doctoroff were fruitful, and in the summer of 2015, Sidewalk Labs was announced to the world. “Every time I talk with Dan I feel an amazing sense of opportunity because of all the ways technology can help transform cities to be more livable, flexible and vibrant,” Page said in a Google+ post.

Two months later, Google announced Alphabet, a new business structure that made Google a subsidiary and its many moonshot projects, including delivery drones and life extension, standalone businesses. Sidewalk Labs was “a new company” from the start, but this corporate shuffle solidified its position as a long-term, experimental bet.

Doctoroff and his team spent the next two years studying more than 100 urban initiatives. This served as preparation for the Waterfront Toronto project, which launched in March 2017. The City of Toronto, with support from the Canadian government, was looking for a partner to rebuild and revitalize roughly 750 acres of land along the Eastern Waterfront. The first phase, or pilot, would be Quayside, a 12-acre site close to the central business district. Several local and international firms submitted proposals, including Sidewalk Labs. On October 17th, 2017, the Alphabet-owned offshoot announced that it had won the bid and given the project a new name: Sidewalk Toronto.

Read more about this project and other smart cities!

via Adafruit

The Future of Global Farming?

Via Make

Combining urban farming with pioneering Agri-tech makers, The Hive Co Farm is the perfect example to follow to engage local generations of farmers, both current and future, on sustainable and innovative farming practices. “Seeing the reaction to the local community after our establishment last year made us even more motivated to pursue this project,” Jaqueline finished.

Read More.

via Adafruit

The Universe from Animaniacs and Monty Python #SaturdayMorningCartoons


via MelodySheep

Sometimes you just need some perspective. So here’s and oldie: a song the size of the cosmos, from the dear departed Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking.

Each Saturday Morning here at Adafruit is Saturday Morning Cartoons! Be sure to check our cartoon and animated posts both nostalgic and new that inspire makers of all ages! You’ll find how-tos for young makers, approaches to learning about science and engineering, and all sorts of comic strip and animated Saturday Morning fun! Be sure to check out our Adafruit products featuring comic book art while you’re at it!

via Adafruit