Category Archives: Makers

What’s the Interrobang All about Anyway?


NewImage

Truly enjoyable listen from 99% Invisible discussing the history of the interrobang with a bonus segment on the history of the octothorpe/octotherp/number sign/hashmark/pound/lumberyard/tic-tac-toe/musical sharp/…or maybe let’s just #…

In the 3rd century BCE, a librarian in Alexandria named Aristophanes introduced the idea of putting in dots to indicate pauses, like stage directions for people performing texts out loud. Dots of ink at the bottom, middle, or top of a given line served as subordinate, intermediate and full points, corresponding to pauses of increasing length.

Aristophanes’ system became the basis for Western punctuation, A partial thought — followed by the shortest pause — was called a comma. A fuller thought was called a kolon. And a complete thought — followed by the longest pause — was called a periodos. These rhetorical units eventually lent their names to the comma, colon and period we know today.

More punctuation followed. Medieval scribes gave us the earliest forms of the exclamation mark. And in the 8th century, Alcuin of York, an English scholar in the court of Charlemagne, quietly introduced a symbol that would evolve into the modern question mark. Ever since, we’ve ended our sentences with one of these three ancient marks, called end marks.

There have, however, been attempts to expand this typographical toolkit, and include other end marks. One such example has made it into dictionaries: the interrobang (‽).

Read more and listen to the full episode here


via Adafruit

What’s the Interrobang All about Anyway?


NewImage

Truly enjoyable listen from 99% Invisible discussing the history of the interrobang with a bonus segment on the history of the octothorpe/octotherp/number sign/hashmark/pound/lumberyard/tic-tac-toe/musical sharp/…or maybe let’s just #…

In the 3rd century BCE, a librarian in Alexandria named Aristophanes introduced the idea of putting in dots to indicate pauses, like stage directions for people performing texts out loud. Dots of ink at the bottom, middle, or top of a given line served as subordinate, intermediate and full points, corresponding to pauses of increasing length.

Aristophanes’ system became the basis for Western punctuation, A partial thought — followed by the shortest pause — was called a comma. A fuller thought was called a kolon. And a complete thought — followed by the longest pause — was called a periodos. These rhetorical units eventually lent their names to the comma, colon and period we know today.

More punctuation followed. Medieval scribes gave us the earliest forms of the exclamation mark. And in the 8th century, Alcuin of York, an English scholar in the court of Charlemagne, quietly introduced a symbol that would evolve into the modern question mark. Ever since, we’ve ended our sentences with one of these three ancient marks, called end marks.

There have, however, been attempts to expand this typographical toolkit, and include other end marks. One such example has made it into dictionaries: the interrobang (‽).

Read more and listen to the full episode here


via Adafruit

What’s the Interrobang All about Anyway?


NewImage

Truly enjoyable listen from 99% Invisible discussing the history of the interrobang with a bonus segment on the history of the octothorpe/octotherp/number sign/hashmark/pound/lumberyard/tic-tac-toe/musical sharp/…or maybe let’s just #…

In the 3rd century BCE, a librarian in Alexandria named Aristophanes introduced the idea of putting in dots to indicate pauses, like stage directions for people performing texts out loud. Dots of ink at the bottom, middle, or top of a given line served as subordinate, intermediate and full points, corresponding to pauses of increasing length.

Aristophanes’ system became the basis for Western punctuation, A partial thought — followed by the shortest pause — was called a comma. A fuller thought was called a kolon. And a complete thought — followed by the longest pause — was called a periodos. These rhetorical units eventually lent their names to the comma, colon and period we know today.

More punctuation followed. Medieval scribes gave us the earliest forms of the exclamation mark. And in the 8th century, Alcuin of York, an English scholar in the court of Charlemagne, quietly introduced a symbol that would evolve into the modern question mark. Ever since, we’ve ended our sentences with one of these three ancient marks, called end marks.

There have, however, been attempts to expand this typographical toolkit, and include other end marks. One such example has made it into dictionaries: the interrobang (‽).

Read more and listen to the full episode here


via Adafruit

The tapestry of the Search for extraterrestrial Intelligence #SciFiSunday


LIFE AT THE EDGES The Tapestry of the Search for Terrestrial Intelligence 1 600x400

Check out Ranjit Bhatnagar’s latest work The Tapestry of the Search for Terrestrial Intelligence, showing through September 30 at Science Gallery Dublin.

Via moonmilk.

In 1977, the two Voyager space probes were launched, each carrying a golden record with music, sounds, and voices from Earth — just in case. The records also feature over a hundred digital images encoded as sounds. If an alien civilization picked up one of the Voyager probes a million years from now, what would they make of the information on the record? They probably wouldn’t think they way we do. They might try to taste the disk, or try to find meaning in the way it feels when they rub their fingers on the grooves. Or they might try to decode the ancient, degraded images onto a forty-meter-long tapestry.

It started when Man Bartlett noticed that a youtube copy of the Voyager Golden Record started with a few minutes of weird beeping sounds before the voices and music of Earth. I knew that there were images somehow encoded on the record, so I loaded the degraded, low quality sounds into photoshop as an image and got ghostly, distorted pictures. You could see that the original information was in there, but it was just out of reach. I didn’t try to apply any image correction techniques, because I thought it was beautiful in its distorted form. When Science Gallery gave me the opportunity to exhibit it, I had it woven as a tapestry on computerized looms.

Read more.


via Adafruit

The tapestry of the Search for extraterrestrial Intelligence #SciFiSunday


LIFE AT THE EDGES The Tapestry of the Search for Terrestrial Intelligence 1 600x400

Check out Ranjit Bhatnagar’s latest work The Tapestry of the Search for Terrestrial Intelligence, showing through September 30 at Science Gallery Dublin.

Via moonmilk.

In 1977, the two Voyager space probes were launched, each carrying a golden record with music, sounds, and voices from Earth — just in case. The records also feature over a hundred digital images encoded as sounds. If an alien civilization picked up one of the Voyager probes a million years from now, what would they make of the information on the record? They probably wouldn’t think they way we do. They might try to taste the disk, or try to find meaning in the way it feels when they rub their fingers on the grooves. Or they might try to decode the ancient, degraded images onto a forty-meter-long tapestry.

It started when Man Bartlett noticed that a youtube copy of the Voyager Golden Record started with a few minutes of weird beeping sounds before the voices and music of Earth. I knew that there were images somehow encoded on the record, so I loaded the degraded, low quality sounds into photoshop as an image and got ghostly, distorted pictures. You could see that the original information was in there, but it was just out of reach. I didn’t try to apply any image correction techniques, because I thought it was beautiful in its distorted form. When Science Gallery gave me the opportunity to exhibit it, I had it woven as a tapestry on computerized looms.

Read more.


via Adafruit

Hear Stanley Kubrick Explain the 2001: A Space Odyssey Ending In a Rare, Unearthed Video #SciFiSunday


Via Esquire.

When it was originally released in 1968, audiences didn’t really know what the hell to think of 2001: A Space Odyssey. In fact, 250 critics walked out of the New York premiere, literally asking aloud, “What is this bullshit?”

Now, 2001 is regarded not just as a sci-fi masterpiece, but as one of the greatest films of all time. Yet, still, people find themselves wondering exactly what happened at the end of the movie, where Dr. David Bowman gets sucked into a Star Gate, trapped in a neoclassical French room then turned into a fetus known as the Star Child.

Read more.


via Adafruit

Hear Stanley Kubrick Explain the 2001: A Space Odyssey Ending In a Rare, Unearthed Video #SciFiSunday


Via Esquire.

When it was originally released in 1968, audiences didn’t really know what the hell to think of 2001: A Space Odyssey. In fact, 250 critics walked out of the New York premiere, literally asking aloud, “What is this bullshit?”

Now, 2001 is regarded not just as a sci-fi masterpiece, but as one of the greatest films of all time. Yet, still, people find themselves wondering exactly what happened at the end of the movie, where Dr. David Bowman gets sucked into a Star Gate, trapped in a neoclassical French room then turned into a fetus known as the Star Child.

Read more.


via Adafruit