What is Cyberpunk: A Brief History #SciFiSunday


via Polygon

A woman doing her makeup as the camera slowly pulls out to reveal she’s missing the bottom half of her face, a gaping cybernetic maw in its place. A cable jacked directly into a businessman’s skull, sparking and smoking as it fries his brain. An elevator the size of an apartment, crawling up the side of a high-rise towards the sky.

These are just some of the fragmented vignettes studio CD Projekt Red put on display in Cyberpunk 2077’s debut trailer earlier this year. As an introduction to Night City, it promised one of the most distinctive game settings since Rapture or City 17 — but not much of its neon-soaked imagery is original. And that’s by design.

With this game, CD Projekt Red is drawing from a long tradition, one that — unusually — is named right there in the title: cyberpunk. But what exactly does that mean, and where did it come from?

Read full article here!


via Adafruit

Listen to the Sound of the black Widow Pulsar #Space


From SYSTEM Sounds on YouTube:

The Black Widow pulsar (PSR B1957+20) rotates at a frequency of 622.1 Hz, producing a radio signal can be heard as an Eb note when converted into sound. The pulsar gets its name from the fact that it is slowly destroying its partner, using its wind to blow material off the surface of the brown dwarf. This creates a clumpy comet-like tail of plasma that passes between the pulsar and Earth every 9.2 hours. The tail acts like a giant magnifying lens (or amplifier) causing the series of irregular flickers you can hear in the pulsar’s signal. Is the brown dwarf trying to signal S.O.S.?

See more


via Adafruit

The Lady Astronaut novels are an enthralling alternate history of the space race #SciFiSunday


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These books look awesome!!

Via The Verge.

In 2013, Mary Robinette Kowal published a story in an audio anthology called “The Lady Astronaut of Mars,” introducing what she described as “punch card punk” science fiction: a story of space exploration with all the trappings of the Apollo program. This summer, she’s added to that world with two new novels: The Calculating Stars and The Fated Sky.

The novels play out in a breathtaking alternate world where humanity must establish a foothold off-world after an asteroid devastates Earth. While that world-ending scenario sets the stage, it’s the underlying social issues that arise in the aftermath, from race relations to gender equality, that really drive the plot. The resulting duology is an enthralling read that’s pressingly relevant in 2018.

Read more.


via Adafruit

Watch as engineers 3D print a bionic eye prototype


Bioniceye 1500x1000

Awesome advances in eye implants. Via Digital Trends:

Now, engineers from the University of Minnesota have made another significant step in the development of bionic eyes. In a paper published this week in the journal Advanced Materials, the researchers describe how they 3D printed a prototype for a synthetic eyeball, equipped with photodetectors that allow the device to pick up light. The prototype could help usher in more advanced devices for visually impaired people.

“Here we demonstrate a fully 3D-printed hemispherical photodetector array that can sensitively detect images with a wide field-of-view,” Ruitao Su, a research assistant at the University of Minnesota who worked on the project, told Digital Trends. “The high efficiency of the photodetectors and the ability to readily customize the size and layout of the design render this approach … promising for the creation of bionic eyes.”

To make the device, the researchers began with a hemispherical glass cone, which they used as a sort of canvass to 3D print an array of photodetectors. Silver nanoparticles were used as conductive interconnections, and a couple layers of semiconductive components helped convert light into electricity. Finally, liquid metal was used to print cathodes on top. The whole process, which took about an hour, is pretty complicated but still generates a relatively primitive prototype.

Learn more!


via Adafruit

How to Stop Structures from Shaking: LEGO Saturn V Tuned Mass Damper


via Minute Physics

This video is about Tuned Mass Dampers, which can be used to reduce or avoid unwanted vibrations, swaying, swinging, bending, etc on engineered structures ranging from buildings, skyscrapers, electricity power transmission lines, airplane engines, formula one race cars, etc. TMD’s use damped coupled oscillators.

More from Minute Physics!


Each Saturday Morning here at Adafruit is Saturday Morning Cartoons! Be sure to check our cartoon and animated posts both nostalgic and new that inspire makers of all ages! You’ll find how-tos for young makers, approaches to learning about science and engineering, and all sorts of comic strip and animated Saturday Morning fun! Be sure to check out our Adafruit products featuring comic book art while you’re at it!


via Adafruit

‘Wormholes Explained,’ with the Help of Some Colorful Animations | #SaturdayMorningCartoons


Brilliant video from the folks at Kurzgesagt explaining various theories of wormholes:

Are wormholes real or are they just magic disguised as physics and maths? And if they are real how do they work and where can we find them? Sources and further reading:
https://authors.library.caltech.edu/9…
http://www.cmp.caltech.edu/refael/lea…


via Adafruit

Roger Bot


via Hackster.io

The design concept of Roger Bot is based on two main features. The robotic arm functions and the the rover maneuverability functions. In addition to this, several sensors have been installed on the rover to retrieve sensory data and display them upon request on a LCD display. All the parts were designed using CATIA V5 software and exported as STL files and printed on a 3D printer.

Roger Bot is designed for indoors and will not be able to handle bumpy and crooked grounds although it performs well on smooth flat surfaces. This is a downfall on the drive capabilities for now and I hope to address this in the future with your input. It has a tripod style wheel arrangement with ample width between the back two wheels so that mild to intense robotic arm movements will not topple Roger Bot over. The three supports with rolling ball wheels on the underbelly of the rover acts as an additional support for the robot arm on the rover.

Read more.


via Adafruit