Tag Archives: Adafruit

Adafruit Weekly Editorial Round-Up: August 13th – August 19th


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ADAFRUIT WEEKLY EDITORIAL ROUND-UP


We’ve got so much happening here at Adafruit that it’s not always easy to keep up! Don’t fret, we’ve got you covered. Each week we’ll be posting a handy round-up of what we’ve been up to, ranging from learn guides to blog articles, videos, and more.


BLOG

Smore06

Latest issue if Smore Magazine!

Issue 6 is here and it is super special. With this issue, we have completed one full year of Smore. We thank you for reading Smore and sharing us with your family and friends.

Take a look at our anniversary issue.

This issue of Smore features the incredibly talented tinkerer Limor Fried. She talks about her passion for creating and sharing. And she wants you to know that it’s ok to fail.

See more!

More BLOG:

Keeping with tradition, we covered quite a bit this past week. Here’s a short list of highlights:


LEARN


Adabot Operation Game
Your turn to operate! Perform surgery on Adabot, but be careful not to touch the sides or the buzzer will sound!!!

Adabot needs your help, Doctor! It’s time to operate!! It takes a steady hand to remove the game pieces!
You can build this fun, classic game using a Circuit Playground Express to react whenever your hand isn’t so steady and your tweezers bump the edge of an opening. You’ll build the board, and then program the Circuit Playground Express using CircuitPython or MakeCode to test the capacitive touch pads for contact.

More LEARN

Browse all that’s new in the Adafruit Learning System here!


via Adafruit

Solar Eclipse of 2017 Boosted Science Interest #MakerEducation


66E4FCEE 5689 463B A6C34E49ED916C1B

Via Scientific American:

In the U.S., some 216 million adults viewed the eclipse. That’s 88 percent of the adult population. This viewership dwarfs that of the Superbowl and ranks among the most watched events in American history. That’s according to the Michigan Scientific Literacy Survey of 2017.

Jon Miller of the University of Michigan conducts a national study of Americans’ scientific know-how twice a year. But last year, he added another survey over the week or two after the eclipse, while the experience was still fresh.

He discovered that in the months prior to the eclipse, there was a flurry of interest in the phenomenon. People searched online for eclipse-related information and talked about it with family and friends.

Miller’s survey also indicates that by the end of 2017, 70 percent of those questioned were able to explain the meaning of a total solar eclipse. That’s a considerable step up from the 50 percent who understood what an eclipse was at the beginning of the year. Even people who didn’t see the eclipse were more likely to correctly define it by year’s end, suggesting that the media coverage and general hubbub rubbed off.

Learn more!


via Adafruit

Solar Eclipse of 2017 Boosted Science Interest #MakerEducation


66E4FCEE 5689 463B A6C34E49ED916C1B

Via Scientific American:

In the U.S., some 216 million adults viewed the eclipse. That’s 88 percent of the adult population. This viewership dwarfs that of the Superbowl and ranks among the most watched events in American history. That’s according to the Michigan Scientific Literacy Survey of 2017.

Jon Miller of the University of Michigan conducts a national study of Americans’ scientific know-how twice a year. But last year, he added another survey over the week or two after the eclipse, while the experience was still fresh.

He discovered that in the months prior to the eclipse, there was a flurry of interest in the phenomenon. People searched online for eclipse-related information and talked about it with family and friends.

Miller’s survey also indicates that by the end of 2017, 70 percent of those questioned were able to explain the meaning of a total solar eclipse. That’s a considerable step up from the 50 percent who understood what an eclipse was at the beginning of the year. Even people who didn’t see the eclipse were more likely to correctly define it by year’s end, suggesting that the media coverage and general hubbub rubbed off.

Learn more!


via Adafruit

Solar Eclipse of 2017 Boosted Science Interest #MakerEducation


66E4FCEE 5689 463B A6C34E49ED916C1B

Via Scientific American:

In the U.S., some 216 million adults viewed the eclipse. That’s 88 percent of the adult population. This viewership dwarfs that of the Superbowl and ranks among the most watched events in American history. That’s according to the Michigan Scientific Literacy Survey of 2017.

Jon Miller of the University of Michigan conducts a national study of Americans’ scientific know-how twice a year. But last year, he added another survey over the week or two after the eclipse, while the experience was still fresh.

He discovered that in the months prior to the eclipse, there was a flurry of interest in the phenomenon. People searched online for eclipse-related information and talked about it with family and friends.

Miller’s survey also indicates that by the end of 2017, 70 percent of those questioned were able to explain the meaning of a total solar eclipse. That’s a considerable step up from the 50 percent who understood what an eclipse was at the beginning of the year. Even people who didn’t see the eclipse were more likely to correctly define it by year’s end, suggesting that the media coverage and general hubbub rubbed off.

Learn more!


via Adafruit

Solar Eclipse of 2017 Boosted Science Interest #MakerEducation


66E4FCEE 5689 463B A6C34E49ED916C1B

Via Scientific American:

In the U.S., some 216 million adults viewed the eclipse. That’s 88 percent of the adult population. This viewership dwarfs that of the Superbowl and ranks among the most watched events in American history. That’s according to the Michigan Scientific Literacy Survey of 2017.

Jon Miller of the University of Michigan conducts a national study of Americans’ scientific know-how twice a year. But last year, he added another survey over the week or two after the eclipse, while the experience was still fresh.

He discovered that in the months prior to the eclipse, there was a flurry of interest in the phenomenon. People searched online for eclipse-related information and talked about it with family and friends.

Miller’s survey also indicates that by the end of 2017, 70 percent of those questioned were able to explain the meaning of a total solar eclipse. That’s a considerable step up from the 50 percent who understood what an eclipse was at the beginning of the year. Even people who didn’t see the eclipse were more likely to correctly define it by year’s end, suggesting that the media coverage and general hubbub rubbed off.

Learn more!


via Adafruit

NASA awards $127K STTR Grant to PADT and ASU for biomimicry 3D printing research #Biomimicry


Nasa awards sttr grant padt asu biomimicry 3d printing research 1

Via 3Ders

NASA has awarded a $127,000 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase I grant to PADT and Arizona State University (ASU) to accelerate biomimicry research, the study of 3D printing objects that resemble strong and light structures found in nature such as honeycombs or bamboo.

Nature is able to create strong, lightweight, and flexible structures that can not be created using traditional ways of manufacturing like machining, molding, or forming. These strong and light structures are very beneficial for objects that need to be launched into space. That is why NASA just awarded PADT and Arizona State University, a Phase 1 STTR grant to explore how to make just this type of geometry.

The research is critically important to major sectors in Arizona such as aerospace because it enables strong and incredibly light parts for use in the development of air and space crafts.

“We’re honored to continue advanced research on biomimicry with our good friends and partners at ASU,” said Rey Chu, principal and co-founder, PADT. “With our combined expertise in 3D printing and computer modeling, we feel that our research will provide a breakthrough in the way that we design objects for NASA, and our broad range of product manufacturing clients.”

Recently, PADT partnered with Lockheed Martin and Stratasys to help NASA develop over 100 3D printed parts for its manned-spaceflight to Mars, the Orion Mission. Specific NASA applications of the research include the design and manufacturing of high-performance materials for use in heat exchanges, lightweight structures and space debris resistant skins. If the first phase is successful, the partners will be eligible for a second, larger grant from NASA.

See more!


via Adafruit

NASA awards $127K STTR Grant to PADT and ASU for biomimicry 3D printing research #Biomimicry


Nasa awards sttr grant padt asu biomimicry 3d printing research 1

Via 3Ders

NASA has awarded a $127,000 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase I grant to PADT and Arizona State University (ASU) to accelerate biomimicry research, the study of 3D printing objects that resemble strong and light structures found in nature such as honeycombs or bamboo.

Nature is able to create strong, lightweight, and flexible structures that can not be created using traditional ways of manufacturing like machining, molding, or forming. These strong and light structures are very beneficial for objects that need to be launched into space. That is why NASA just awarded PADT and Arizona State University, a Phase 1 STTR grant to explore how to make just this type of geometry.

The research is critically important to major sectors in Arizona such as aerospace because it enables strong and incredibly light parts for use in the development of air and space crafts.

“We’re honored to continue advanced research on biomimicry with our good friends and partners at ASU,” said Rey Chu, principal and co-founder, PADT. “With our combined expertise in 3D printing and computer modeling, we feel that our research will provide a breakthrough in the way that we design objects for NASA, and our broad range of product manufacturing clients.”

Recently, PADT partnered with Lockheed Martin and Stratasys to help NASA develop over 100 3D printed parts for its manned-spaceflight to Mars, the Orion Mission. Specific NASA applications of the research include the design and manufacturing of high-performance materials for use in heat exchanges, lightweight structures and space debris resistant skins. If the first phase is successful, the partners will be eligible for a second, larger grant from NASA.

See more!


via Adafruit