Watch as engineers 3D print a bionic eye prototype


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Awesome advances in eye implants. Via Digital Trends:

Now, engineers from the University of Minnesota have made another significant step in the development of bionic eyes. In a paper published this week in the journal Advanced Materials, the researchers describe how they 3D printed a prototype for a synthetic eyeball, equipped with photodetectors that allow the device to pick up light. The prototype could help usher in more advanced devices for visually impaired people.

“Here we demonstrate a fully 3D-printed hemispherical photodetector array that can sensitively detect images with a wide field-of-view,” Ruitao Su, a research assistant at the University of Minnesota who worked on the project, told Digital Trends. “The high efficiency of the photodetectors and the ability to readily customize the size and layout of the design render this approach … promising for the creation of bionic eyes.”

To make the device, the researchers began with a hemispherical glass cone, which they used as a sort of canvass to 3D print an array of photodetectors. Silver nanoparticles were used as conductive interconnections, and a couple layers of semiconductive components helped convert light into electricity. Finally, liquid metal was used to print cathodes on top. The whole process, which took about an hour, is pretty complicated but still generates a relatively primitive prototype.

Learn more!


via Adafruit

How to Stop Structures from Shaking: LEGO Saturn V Tuned Mass Damper


via Minute Physics

This video is about Tuned Mass Dampers, which can be used to reduce or avoid unwanted vibrations, swaying, swinging, bending, etc on engineered structures ranging from buildings, skyscrapers, electricity power transmission lines, airplane engines, formula one race cars, etc. TMD’s use damped coupled oscillators.

More from Minute Physics!


Each Saturday Morning here at Adafruit is Saturday Morning Cartoons! Be sure to check our cartoon and animated posts both nostalgic and new that inspire makers of all ages! You’ll find how-tos for young makers, approaches to learning about science and engineering, and all sorts of comic strip and animated Saturday Morning fun! Be sure to check out our Adafruit products featuring comic book art while you’re at it!


via Adafruit

‘Wormholes Explained,’ with the Help of Some Colorful Animations | #SaturdayMorningCartoons


Brilliant video from the folks at Kurzgesagt explaining various theories of wormholes:

Are wormholes real or are they just magic disguised as physics and maths? And if they are real how do they work and where can we find them? Sources and further reading:
https://authors.library.caltech.edu/9…
http://www.cmp.caltech.edu/refael/lea…


via Adafruit

Roger Bot


via Hackster.io

The design concept of Roger Bot is based on two main features. The robotic arm functions and the the rover maneuverability functions. In addition to this, several sensors have been installed on the rover to retrieve sensory data and display them upon request on a LCD display. All the parts were designed using CATIA V5 software and exported as STL files and printed on a 3D printer.

Roger Bot is designed for indoors and will not be able to handle bumpy and crooked grounds although it performs well on smooth flat surfaces. This is a downfall on the drive capabilities for now and I hope to address this in the future with your input. It has a tripod style wheel arrangement with ample width between the back two wheels so that mild to intense robotic arm movements will not topple Roger Bot over. The three supports with rolling ball wheels on the underbelly of the rover acts as an additional support for the robot arm on the rover.

Read more.


via Adafruit

Lindsay Henwood’s Women at Work #celebratephotography



NewImage

Beautiful portraits and shot bios from Lindsay Henwood via Booooooom:

We live in a society with certain expectations. Expectations of what a woman does and does not do. Expectations of which jobs are respectable, often closely tied to making the most money, and what our goals should be – financially, professionally, and domestically. Many women let these expectations drive our life decisions, knowingly or not. This series is a celebration of women at work, doing what they love with no questions asked. It’s not about money or society’s image of success. At some point in their lives, they self-motivated their way to where they are now. Unapologetically doing their thing and doing it well.

Read more and see more from Lindsay Henwood


Photofooter

We #celebratephotography here at Adafruit every Saturday. From photographers of all levels to projects you have made or those that inspire you to make, we’re on it! Got a tip? Well, send it in!

If you’re interested in making your own project and need some gear, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out our Raspberry Pi accessories and our DIY cameras.


via Adafruit

Make Better Time-Lapses with Fstoppers #celebratephotography


From Fstoppers on YouTube:

In this short photography tutorial, we show you how you can improve your timelapses by taking long shutter exposures and exporting them in Adobe Premiere. By using a Polar Pro 10 stop neutral density filter, Patrick Hall increases his shutter from 1/3rd of a second to 2 full seconds when shooting in bright sunlight.

See more and read more


Photofooter

We #celebratephotography here at Adafruit every Saturday. From photographers of all levels to projects you have made or those that inspire you to make, we’re on it! Got a tip? Well, send it in!

If you’re interested in making your own project and need some gear, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out our Raspberry Pi accessories and our DIY cameras.


via Adafruit

The Power of Anomalies


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Progress in science is sometimes propelled by the discovery of experimental oddities that inspire a fresh perspective on nature, Via Scientific American

Progress in science is sometimes triggered by surprises. Data collection resembles gathering of new pieces in a jigsaw puzzle and placing them together. Sometimes one of the pieces does not quite fit. It is natural for scientists to instinctively argue that such a piece does not belong; perhaps it is an artifact driven by uncertainties in the data or a misinterpretation of the experiment. This might indeed be the case in most instances. But every now and then, an anomaly of this type signals a real discrepancy from expectations, either a violation of a highly respected but incomplete law of nature—namely an exception to the rule, or an unexpected surprise—signaling the possibility of “new physics.”

One of the well-known historical examples involves the discovery of the Planck spectrum of blackbody radiation, which could not have been explained by classical physics and which ushered in quantum mechanics. The anomaly was declared by the British physicist Lord Kelvin in 1900 as one of the two remaining dark clouds obscuring “the beauty and clearness of the dynamical theory” before its revolutionary role in the development of modern physics was recognized. A more recent example involves quasicrystals, which represent a state of solids that violates translational symmetry. Their accidental discovery by Dan Shechtman in 1982 was discredited for decades since it violated textbook assumptions, but its significance was eventually recognized by the Nobel Prize Committee in 2011.

An example for a current unresolved anomaly involves the reported discrepancy between the measured values of the Hubble constant H0 (the expansion rate of the universe) in the local universe (based on observations of supernovae) and in the universe just 400,000 years after the big bang (as measured from the brightness anisotropies of the cosmic background radiation). If real, this anomaly might signal the existence of a sterile neutrino; a form of decaying dark matter; a growing dark energy or something else. Another current example involves the anomalously strong absorption of electromagnetic radiation by hydrogen atoms during the cosmic dawn, as measured by the EDGES experiment, which might potentially indicate some form of interaction between ordinary matter and dark matter.

See more!


via Adafruit