Tag Archives: astrophotography

Pi in the Sky – Piday Art #ArtTuesday

Via Scientific American

Elegant new visualization maps the digits of pi as a star catalogue

The mind of Martin Krzywinski is a rich and dizzying place, teeming with fascinating questions, ideas, and inspiration. Krzywinski is a scientist and data visualizer whose primary line of work involves genome analysis for cancer research. In his spare time, though, he explores his many different interests as a scientific and visual thinker through creative projects. For the past few years, one such project has occupied him on a recurring basis each March: reimagining the digits of pi in a novel, science-based, and visually compelling way.
Today, this delightful March 14th (“Pi Day”) tradition brings us the digits of pi mapped onto the night sky, as a star catalogue. Like the infinitely long sequence of pi, space has no discernible end, but we earthbound observers can only see so far. So Krzywinski places a cap at 12 million digits and groups each successive series of 12 numerals to define a latitude, longitude and brightness, resulting in a field of a million stars, randomly arranged.

Read more and check out Martin Krzywiski’s website! You can purchase his artwork in poster form here!


Screenshot 4 2 14 11 48 AMEvery Tuesday is Art Tuesday here at Adafruit! Today we celebrate artists and makers from around the world who are designing innovative and creative works using technology, science, electronics and more. You can start your own career as an artist today with Adafruit’s conductive paints, art-related electronics kits, LEDs, wearables, 3D printers and more! Make your most imaginative designs come to life with our helpful tutorials from the Adafruit Learning System. And don’t forget to check in every Art Tuesday for more artistic inspiration here on the Adafruit Blog!

 

via Adafruit

A Star is Born: Skywatcher Photo Captures Dark-Hued Nebula

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This photo shows the cosmic region known as Sh2-239 and LDN 155, where star formation activity has caused the mix of dust and colors in the nebulas visible here. The deep colors and dark clouds in this image resemble paintings by some of history’s greatest artists.

The region lies near the southern end of Taurus located on the border of the constellations of Taurus and Perseus more than 400 light-years away. A light-year is the distance light travels in one year, or about 6 trillion miles (10 trillion kilometers).

Astrophotographer Adam Block of the Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter at the University of Arizona  was one of the first to capture the nebula in such detail. He took multiple exposures to collect enough light for an image that would otherwise not be evident to the eye.

Full Article

Credit: Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona

Taking photos of the moon with an iPhone

Taking photos of the moon with an iPhone

Good Sats Hunting: Leave It To The Amateurs

Good Sats Hunting: Leave It To The Amateurs