Tag Archives: Sensors

TPL5110 & P-Channel MOSFET on @sparkfun SOIC to DIP 8-Pin Adapter = DIY Timer | via @PublicLab


This is a neat challenge from Public Lab user cfastie who made this cute low-power timer for data-logging projects, mounting a DIP6 IC on a DIP8 adapter, using the other adapter pads for additional connections – neat! They even mention our own TPL5110 breakout for comparison; the adapter used is already quite smaller than our own breakout size (with a few fewer features sacrificed) and they conclude they could further minify their own design using smaller resistor/s than those shown above.

Adding a low power timer to a data logger has great promise as an easy way to extend the time the logger can operate on small batteries. Rough calculations suggest that a few AA batteries can power an Arduino-based logger for a year or more when a TLP5110 timer controls the current flowing to the logger.

The Adafruit Low Power Logger costs $4.95 (plus shipping) which adds a substantial proportion to the cost of a DIY Arduino-based data logger. So I investigated making my own timer using the same components. The only components needed are the TPL5110 timer IC, a mosfet, and a resistor. Not including shipping, these cost $1.25 per set if you buy 10 of each. So I did.


One of my DIY timers was controlling a Mini Pearl Logger in my freezer the other day. A 61.9kΩ resistor set the logging interval at 12 minutes. The graph includes 10 hours of data. My freezer temperature varies a lot more than I thought it would.

Read more here.


via Adafruit

The Ultimate Legends of the Hidden Temple Accessory


Remember Legends of the Hidden Temple? The show aired in the ’90s on Nickelodeon. It was an action-adventure show mixed with education. Olmec narrated the temple challenges and the story, and if you ever wanted to cosplay as a player in the game, Redditor ShotzyProps came up with a design for a talisman with Olmec’s face. He says it was simple to make:

I designed it using photoshop and reference photos because it’s what I’m most familiar with, then I exported it as a 3D model and prepped it for 3D printing. After printing it I filled it with bondo/primer and sanded it smooth before molding it in silicone rubber. Then used a method call ‘cold casting’ to cast it using bronze metal powder and urethane resin.

via Reddit


via Adafruit

18,000 @particle Mesh devices from first manufacturing run of 20K, happening in July



18,000 @particle Mesh devices from first manufacturing run of 20K, happening in July.


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Particle’s Next Generation Hardware – Compatible with Adafruit Feather! Pick one up here.


via Adafruit

NEW PRODUCTS – PLA Filament for 3D Printers – 2.85mm Diameter – MeltInk – In Various Colors


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NEW PRODUCTS – PLA Filament for 3D Printers – 2.85mm Diameter – MeltInk – In Various Colors


Having a 3D printer without filament is sort of like having a regular printer without paper or ink. And while a lot of printers come with some filament there’s a good chance you’ve been printing up a storm and want something new.  That’s why we carry 3D printing filament in a variety of colors!

These PLA Filaments with 2.85mm diameter are great beginner filaments with a nice, glossy finish.

It’s always a good idea to check what diameter and filament type your printer can handle before purchasing! Please note this is 2.85mm filament, not compatible with 1.75mm-only machines!

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PLA is bioplastic as it’s made from renewable natural resources. Since it’s biodegradable in commercial compost facilities, you can feel good and green about whatever you’re printing.  There’s less warping when printing with PLA, and it works best when extruded between 195°C and 225°C.

If you’re looking for more information on the different types of 3D printing material, here’s a great tutorial on our Learn System!

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3737 detail ORIG 2018 02

In stock and shipping now!


via Adafruit

NEW GUIDE: sino:bit MicroPython


sino:bit MicroPython is a new guide in the Adafruit Learning System:

The sino:bit is a small board computer for learning about programming and science like the BBC micro:bit.  What makes the sino:bit special is that it’s designed for a world-wide audience.  The inspiration for the sino:bit came from Naomi Wu who realized boards like the micro:bit could only be used by Western, English-speaking audiences because their small grid of LEDs couldn’t display large characters from Chinese and other languages.  Naomi worked with Elecrow to design the sino:bit as a world learning computer, one which has a large enough 12×12 LED matrix to display almost any character.  The power of the sino:bit is that it can open the doorway to learning about computing to a world-wide audience of makers!

MicroPython is a port of the Python programming language that supports small computers like the BBC micro:bit.  Since the sino:bit shares so much hardware with the micro:bit it’s possible to use a sino:bit MicroPython port to program the sino:bit with Python code!  This guide explores how to use the sino:bit MicroPython port.

sino:bit MicroPython


via Adafruit

NEW PRODUCT – Pimoroni pHAT Stack for Raspberry Pi


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NEW PRODUCT – Pimoroni pHAT Stack for Raspberry Pi


We’re doffing our Mini Black HAT Hack3r for the evening because it’s showtime for Pimoroni’s pHAT Stack! This expansive breakout PCB offers 6 sets of 2×20 pin headers – one for connecting to your Pi and the other 5 for a plethora of HATs, pHATs or bonnets.

The combinations are endless… It’s perfect for your projects, displaying temperatures, times, etc. and becomes really useful when combined with other boards like the OLED Bonnet or Inky pHAT plus maybe an Enviro pHAT to display the sensor values.

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Before you cobble your set-up, we recommend checking that your boards are all compatible with each other. Since the Raspberry Pi has a limited number of GPIO pins, there’s a strong chance your pins may clash. Take a looksie at Pinout’s cool experimental Raspberry Pi pinout configurator, and of course check the specification sheets, pinouts or datasheets for all your fancy add-ons.

3742 kit ORIG 02 2018

Features:

  • Five sets of 2×20 pin headers
  • HAT and pHAT mounting holes (M2.5) and labels
  • Handy pinout, including BCM numbers and labels
  • GPIO ribbon cable in classy Adafruit black
  • Comes assembled!

Kit includes:

  • pHAT Stack PCB
  • 6x 2×20 male GPIO pins pre-soldered!
  • 5x pairs of black brass standoffs
  • 4x rubber non-slip feet
  • 40-pin black GPIO ribbon cable

Note: Raspberry Pi not included. But we have so many options in the store, works with any Pi that has a 2×20 connector.

3742 quarter ORIG 02 2018

In stock and shipping now!


via Adafruit

Motorized Table Dolly Upgraded with Spring-Loaded Motor Mount, Hot Rod Look, Made Around PVC Pipe Frame | #celebratephotography


Spotted over at DIY Photography, the video generated some interesting gear ratio commentary over at Hackaday too.

Anybody who shoots video or timelapse knows that the key to getting great shots often involves camera movement. This is why sliders and dollies are so popular. Almost every timelapse shooter or filmmaker I know owns one. Of course, they’re not cheap. So lots of people have come up with ingenious ways to build their own. Including one from way back in 2011 by Frugal Filmmaker that costs less than $20.

For Eric Strebel, though, while it worked great, he wanted more. So, he upgraded the one he made to add a motor. The problem is, it’s too fast. So now he’s upgraded it again to turn it into a motorised Hot Rod table dolly. The construction extends Frugal Filmmaker’s original design quite nicely. It’s a fairly simple modification, but you may need to use a few more tools.

Read more.

Also, +1 for that C.O.C. shirt!


Related:

Motorized Camera Slider MK3


via Adafruit